Tibetan Spaniels: Common Facts and Health Problems

A happy, loving breed of dog, the Tibetan Spaniel is also a perfect companion. Take this breed into consideration if you’re wanting to get a dog but aren’t sure what breed to choose. Here are some facts about Tibetan Spaniels that may help you get more comfortable with these adorable animals.
Like any breed, the dogs are adorable and will make you feel better, but they also have health problems. Before you adopt your pet, be aware of these so you can best assist them when they are in need Tibetan Spaniels: Common Facts and Health Problems.

  • prone to boredom, separation anxiety, and problems when left alone.
  • Exercises every day; cannot take severe corrections or negative reinforcement needs family attention regularly.
  • distant from outsiders.
  • Can be violent, timid, or irritable if improperly socialized.

The Tibetan Spaniel

The-Tibetan-Spaniel
The-Tibetan-Spaniel

The earliest canine breed bred by humans in Tibet was the little, clever Tibetan Spaniel. The dog has a short, blunt nose and a small, domed head. Additionally, it’s typical for the muzzle to have some wrinkles beneath the nose. Both the nose and the eyes are black. The medium-oval eyes are likewise widely spaced apart. The Tibetan Spaniel’s eyes are not covered in additional skin Tibetan Spaniels: Common Facts and Health Problems .

The ears can hang down to the cheek and droop down adjacent to the head. They also have v-shaped feathers. A mane of hair covers the neck as well. Tibetan Spaniels have “hare-like” feet and bowed front legs. The fluffy, feathery tail of the dog rests high on their back.

Tibetan Dogs also possess a shiny second layer that, for the most part, lies flat against its skin. The coat will also have a medium length. There are three types of colors: solid, shaded, and multicolored. Shades of red, fawn, gold, white, cream, black, tan, and parti are also noted by breeders. Most likely, the feet will be white. The breed weighs between nine and fifteen pounds and reaches a shoulder height of approximately ten inches.

Common Facts

They aren’t Technically Spaniels

They-aren-Technically-Spaniels
They-aren-Technically-Spaniels

Spaniels are gun dogs because they were bred by humans to help hunters locate and retrieve game. These varieties are adept at tracking wildlife and can withstand the cacophonous sounds of weapons.

The Tibetan Spaniel is not a gun dog, in contrast to other spaniels. Since the breed is meant to be a companion, it cannot help in hunting. The term “epagnuel” in French, which denoted a comfort dog and companion preferred by people in royal courts, may be the source of the misnomer. It might possibly originate from the fact that they resemble lapdog variants of hunting spaniels.

They were Bred for Buddhist Monasteries

They-were-Bred-for-Buddhist-Monasteries
They-were-Bred-for-Buddhist-Monasteries

The Tibetan Spaniel originated in monasteries dedicated to Buddhism. They still work in monasteries alongside Tibetan Mastiffs, lamas, and monks. During the icy winters, the spaniels slept on beds with monks and lamas to stay warm. The breed is believed to have originated from tiny monastic dogs that were devoted to their chosen Lama.

The Tibetan Spaniel has Multiple Names

The-Tibetan-Spaniel-has-Multiple-Names
The-Tibetan-Spaniel-has-Multiple-Names

There are numerous names for the Tibetan Spaniel, depending on who you speak to. The monks at the monasteries referred to them as “Little Lions.” The breed resembles the Tibetan celestial animal known as the Snow Lion. Despite not being sold, the animal’s value increased due to its symbolic meaning.

It is advisable to refer to the dog as Simkhyi if you are visiting Tibet. The term refers to a bedroom, living room, or house dog. In regions where English is spoken, the Tibetan Spaniel is occasionally referred to as the Tibbie. Most of the time, loving breed owners will refer to their pet by its nickname rather than by its full name.

Some Appear in Ancient Art

Some-Appear-in-Ancient-Art
Some-Appear-in-Ancient-Art

The Tibetan Spaniel is at least 3,000 years old, according to research that shows the breed in artwork from as early as 1100 B.C. According to some, this means that the Lhasa Apso and Pekingese descended from the Tibetan Spaniel.

They were the Perfect Gift

They-were-the-Perfect-Gift
They-were-the-Perfect-Gift

Tibetan Spaniels have never been price-sensitive. Rather, monks gave the animals as gifts to national leaders of Buddhist nations. From then, the royals allegedly crossed the tibbies with their pugs to produce the Pekingese. According to other accounts, Lamas crossed Pekingese with Lhasa Apsos after receiving them as gifts from royals.

The Dogs are Guardians

The-Dogs-are-Guardians
The-Dogs-are-Guardians

The Tibetan Spaniel had, and still has, a significant role in the monastery. The animal guards the shrine in this way. When they notice someone approaching, they will sit along the tops of the monastery walls and bark loudly. If you own a tibbie and you don’t live in a monastery, you may observe that your pet has this behavior.

The Dogs are Part of the Cycle of Reincarnation

The-Dogs-are-Part-of-the-Cycle-of-Reincarnation
The-Dogs-are-Part-of-the-Cycle-of-Reincarnation

Every animal on Earth, including humans, is a part of Buddhism’s reincarnation cycle. Because of this belief, anyone can be a Tibetan Spaniel in their afterlife, including monks, lamas, and even Buddhas. Dogs play a significant role in Tibet as companions for individuals pursuing spirituality.

Health Problems

Eye Disease

Eye-Disease
Eye-Disease

The main concern for anyone considering or currently owning a Tibetan Spaniel is eye problems. Retinal degeneration can proceed over time in Tibetan Spaniels. There are two types of this hereditary illness: central and widespread. Tibetan Spaniels are most likely to exhibit the generalized form. In between one and a half and four years of age, the veterinarian will most likely see evidence of increasing retinal atrophy. It can take up to seven years at times. Dogs with the condition become entirely blind, although it causes no pain.

Dental Disease

Dental-Disease
Dental-Disease

The head and mouth of the Tibetan Spaniel breed are petite in relation to their physique. Additionally, the majority have underbite or even overbite bites. The teeth are unable to grow in a healthy manner as a result. The breed may develop dental decay and require extraction of certain teeth through surgery.

Bad Knees

Bad-Knees
Bad-Knees

Tibetan Spaniels with a long torso and small legs are generally preferred by breeders. The animal had joint and bone problems as a result of its unnatural size. Loose knee joints or luxating patellas are one such problem. Pain from the bad knees might occasionally result in the tibbie losing the ability to move its legs. Expensive surgery is the only treatment for luxating patella.

Chronic Allergies

Chronic-Allergies
Chronic-Allergies

Allergies affect a lot of pets, including Tibetan Spaniels. Most of the time, the animal will have skin problems. They could suffer rashes, scrape and itch, and eventually get an infection on their skin. If this is the case, you may need to place your animal in a cone. A prolapsed third eyelid known as “cherry eye” can also affect the animals.

Hip and Elbow Dysplasia

Hip-and-Elbow-Dysplasia
Hip-and-Elbow-Dysplasia

Again, skeletal or joint problems are common in Tibetan Spaniels because of their size. Elbow or hip dysplasia affects a large number of the animals throughout their lifespan. The Tibetan Spaniel enjoys making abrupt turns and maneuvers in addition to running swiftly. A hip or elbow joint could slide out of position as a result of this habit. You must take in this instance, take your pet to the vet.

FAQs

Do Tibetan Spaniels have health issues?

A few health issues with Tibetan Spaniels can be concerning, particularly if you don’t exercise caution while purchasing from vendors. They consist of patellar luxation, or difficulties with the knee.

Are Tibetan Spaniels high maintenance?

The fur on the bottoms of Tibetan spaniels’ paws should be occasionally clipped, and their coats should be brushed frequently to avoid matting, but otherwise, they do not require frequent trims or grooming visits.

What do Tibetan Spaniels eat?

The Tibetan Spaniel’s nutritional needs
Choose a food rich in premium animal-based protein sources, such as beef, chicken, turkey, lamb, duck, eggs, and fish, for your Tibetan Spaniel.

Reference

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