Bridle

Not every bridled horse is an official “bridle horse.” Since the 1500s, bridle horses have existed, and their extensive training is necessary. The result is a ranch and cow horse that is obedient and well-mannered.
The introduction of Spanish cowboys, or vaqueros, to North America hundreds of years ago marked the beginning of the history of bridle horses. A good bridle horse takes years of training to produce. You only need one hand to ride these incredibly well-groomed horses. They were intended to be all-purpose stock and working ranch horses.

How to Put a Bridle on a Horse

How-to-Put-a-Bridle-on-a-Horse

Before bridling your horse, make sure he is stopped and tethered firmly. Even while some horse owners like to keep their horses loose, this could be dangerous in public stables where people might scare or divert the animal. It’s critical to keep your horse restrained around other horses and humans when at the stable to avoid accidents. Make careful to use a safety knot if you are not using crossties. You should also brush the horse’s face to get rid of any grit or grime. Grooming horses is a must before riding them.

Secure Your Horse

Secure-Your-Horse

Undo the halter, slide the noseband down over the horse’s nose, and reposition the crown over its ears. This will hold your horse in place as you fasten the bridle. Step forward and place the bridle in your left hand next to the horse’s neck. Raise the reins so they are above the horse’s neck. The reins and halter are now around the horse’s neck in case it attempts to break free.

Slide the Bit in the Horse’s Mouth

Secure Your Horse

Using your left hand fingers, move the bit against his lips. Then, insert your thumb between the bars of the mouth or the space between the front and rear teeth. If the horse is refusing to accept the bit, you can try twisting your thumb to force its mouth wider. Sliding the bit in and raising the bridle with your left hand will stop the horse from spitting out the bit again. Be cautious when you are near the horse’s teeth since you do not want the bit to accidently knock into them. Eventually, you’ll be able to execute this maneuver flawlessly in a single session.

Pull the Crown Over the Left Ear

Pull the Crown Over the Left Ear

Holding the bridle’s crown with your left hand, carefully bend the horse’s right ear forward with your right to make it fit beneath the crown.

Pull the Crown Over the Right Ear

Pull the Crown Over the Right Ear

Slide your left ear under the bridle’s crown with caution after shifting your grip from the crown to your right hand. If you pull the bridle too high, the horse will become agitated. Be careful not to bend your horse’s ears too much.

Fasten All the Buckles or Snaps

Fasten All the Buckles or Snaps

Secure the bridle’s throat latch. There is a snap at the throat clasp on an endurance bridle. The majority of conventional leather bridles come with buckles. The throat latch should not be secured too firmly since you want your horse to be able to bend its neck. Allow for roughly 4 inches of leeway. The space between the strap and your horse’s jaw should be as wide as your hand.
When attaching the noseband or cavesson, leave about two fingers’ width between the lower jaw and the strap, unless you’re using a special noseband, like a figure-eight, flash, or grackle noseband. You must secure the curb chain or strap if you are using a curb bit. Maintain a two-finger width gap between each chain. in addition to the mandible. If the chain is left unduly tight or slack, the action of the bit or the chain may become more severe. If the bit has a port, it could rotate upward and cause damage to the horse’s upper mouth.
Once you remove the halter and tuck your horse’s mane and forelock into tidy rows, you’re good to go. Some people prefer their forelocks worn under the browband, while others want them worn excessively long.

Removing the Bridle

Removing the Bridle

To take the bridle from the horse, place the halter (which is attached to a lead rope or crosstie) back over its ears. Take off the neck latch, curb chain, and noseband. Using your left hand, reach under the horse’s neck and slide the crown over its ears. Hold it like you did when you were putting it on. Gently take the bit out of the horse’s mouth. Be careful not to smack the horse in the fangs. Using your right hand to put on the halter and draw the reins up over the horse’s neck will remove the bridle completely. You may wish to clean your bridle or wipe the bit before storing it.

Reference

https://www.thesprucepets.com/how-to-put-a-bridle-on-a-horse-1886275

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