13 Types of Angelfish for Freshwater Aquariums

Angelfish are a wonderful addition to any aquarium because they come in a variety of sizes and can grow to quite enormous sizes. We strongly advise doing some study before making a purchase because certain varieties will be more aggressive than others, require more water, or like more or less greenery than others.

Fish

fish

We’ve compiled a list of the top 13 varieties of angelfish that are commonly seen in aquariums worldwide, and we’ll examine each one and explain its unique characteristics. To assist you with making an informed decision, we’ll cover topics like as aggression, defining traits, maximum growth size, tank size, and more.

The 13 Types of Angelfish

Albino Angelfish

Albino Angelfish

With hints of orange and yellow around the face, the hue of this original breed of angelfish can vary from white to silver. In any situation, their eyes will be pink and light-sensitive. Albino angelfish are easy to care for and can grow to be approximately 6 inches long. They need aquariums larger than 30 gallons with lots of room for free swimming. To hide from the light, they enjoy hiding under rocks and driftwood; however, take care not to overcrowd the tank and obstruct their freedom of movement.

Black Lace Angelfish

Black Lace Angelfish

Due to their rarity in comparison to many other angelfish on this list, black lace angelfish are typically a little more costly as well. Because of their aversion to noise, this breed is not appropriate for loud music or apartments on main street. Compared to many of the others, they are less aggressive and more laid back, opting to remain still for an extended period of swimming. Additionally, black lacy angelfish are slightly more sensitive to lower temperatures, therefore a dependable heater and precise thermostat are essential.

Black Veil Angelfish

Black Veil Angelfish

Since Black Lace Angelfish are less common than many of the other angelfish on our list, their prices are typically a little higher. Loud music and apartments on main street are not ideal environments for this breed because they dislike noise. They are not quite as aggressive as many of the others and are more laid back, opting to keep still for an extended swim. Black Lace Angelfish require a dependable heater and precise thermostat because they are also slightly more sensitive to lower temperatures.

Leopard Angelfish

Leopard Angelfish

Compared to the Black Lace Angelfish, the Black Veil Angelfish is slightly darker in color. As it ages, its fins get longer, and it can withstand some variations in water temperature and pH. It’s also one of the easiest breeds of Angelfish to keep alive because it can live in both soft and hard water. There’s a decent possibility you’ve seen a Black Veil Angelfish before because it’s one of the easiest to locate.

Koi Angelfish

Koi Angelfish

When the Blushing Angelfish reaches adulthood, its black fins and primarily white body start to take on blue stripes. This breed is best suited for a thickly vegetated tank with driftwood, various items, and rock formations. With enough space in the tank, coexisting fish can live in harmony. Blushing Angelfish stand out in any home thanks to their vivid hues.

Marble Angelfish

Marble Angelfish

One of the rarer varieties of angelfish is the clown angelfish, and you might have trouble finding one without putting in a lot of work. These fish have a complicated pattern all over their body, with different sized and shaped spots. Compared to many other breeds, clown angelfish are easier to care for and more tranquil. These fish favor tall plants over caverns and rocks, and they thrive in aquariums with lots of vegetation and hiding spots.

Platinum Angelfish

Platinum Angelfish

Angelfish lacking their colorful markings are known as ghost angelfish, as they are genetically stripped of their stripes. Ghost Angelfish come in both light and dark colors, and they are generally more aggressive and gregarious than many other types. As the Ghost Angelfish ages, it may occasionally start to exhibit stripes.

Blushing Angelfish

Blushing Angelfish

Smaller in size, the gold angelfish is a native of Northern South America’s river systems, especially those in the Amazon Basin. This breed is primarily reddish-orange, though it can also have some brown coloring. It typically reaches a maximum height of four inches. The eyes are orange, as are the lips and fins on all of them. There can also be yellow vertical lines on it.
The Gold Angelfish is an uncommon sight in aquariums ms since they typically don’t get along with other fish and need a tank bigger than 55 gallons.

Clown Angelfish

Clown Angelfish

A common breed of angelfish to keep in aquariums is the leopard angelfish. These fish are known for their distinctive speckled pattern, which is caused by a blue gene that delays the appearance of color until the fish is almost fully developed. They can grow to be at least six inches long and frequently live for more than ten years.

Ghost Angelfish

Ghost Angelfish

The striking black and white coloring of the Koi Angelfish is its main selling point. In addition, there are additional hues like as orange and brown, and each fish has a unique design. These fish like slightly alkaline water in tanks that are at least thirty gallons.

Gold Angelfish

Gold Angelfish

The remarkable hues of Marble Angelfish are black, white, and yellow arranged in a marble pattern all over their body. Their fins are tiny and slender, and they can extend past their torso. Marble Angelfish need a minimum of thirty gallons of clear water with lots of swimming space. The Marble Angelfish is a low maintenance fish that reaches up to six inches in length.

Platinum Angelfish

There are very few aquariums with Platinum Angelfish because they are a somewhat uncommon find. The scales shimmer when light reflects off of them; they are glossy and metallic in appearance. These fish need a tank that can accommodate at least thirty gallons, and they prefer it to be densely planted with lots of hiding places. Additionally, because they are semi-aggressive, you must be cautious about what fish you let into their house.

Smokey Angelfish

Smokey-Angelfish

Usually, there are two types of Smokey Angelfish: ordinary and chocolate. The only difference between the two is that the chocolate type is a deeper shade of brown. Though exact coverage varies, the smokey coloring typically starts in the middle of the dorsal fin and can extend all the way over the fish’s back. Under the pigmentation, the original color might or might not be apparent, and the smokey color won’t be symmetrical.

Zebra Angelfish

Zebra Angelfish

One of the bigger varieties of angelfish, the zebra can grow to be more than 10 inches long. This breed’s males and females can easily be distinguished from one another based on appearance. The females have a black band surrounding their eyes and are light blue in color. Black stripes are also present on the top and bottom of the tail in females. The color of the male Zebra Angelfish has a light blue hue. With narrow, dark stripes running vertically along the sides of the fish, the pattern is similar to that of a zebra.
The Zebra Angelfish has a single male leader that oversees a harem of females, in contrast to the majority of other angelfish that mate for life and live in pairs. When the man passes away, the most senior woman will change into a man to replace him. All female zebra angelfish are born as such, changing to male status only when necessary.

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Reference

https://petkeen.com/popular-types-of-angelfish/

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